A simple tray to collect your keys, watches and other stuff: 3/4" thick sapele was used here, but any hardwood will do. Nice way to use up some cutoffs. The hollowed out area was done on the table saw. This is accomplished by running the piece crosswise to the saw blade and done in stages, raising the blade about a 1/16" at a time. Clamped guides on the table saw top were used to keep the piece from wandering during the cutting process. This takes a bit of patience and planning. I made numerous ones of these using various pieces of inlay banding to dress them up a bit. Makes a great gift.




A round cheeseboard: 3/4" thick cherry with a 2-1/2" ebony/holly compass rose and ebony/holly bendable inlay banding (banding # 199). This is 1/8" wide X 1/8" thick banding - made to bend with heat. On this particular application the bend is not severe, so a heat gun was used to coax the banding to shape. The round channel, 1/8" wide and just under 1/8" deep is routed using a home-made circle jig. Then the end of the banding is placed in the channel and heat applied with the heat gun. Continuing to progressively heat and push the banding in the channel until the end is reached, and the banding is trimmed to join the starting end. The banding will retain this approximate shape so it can be removed and placed back in the channel with yellow wood glue, and clamped. A simple olive oil finish (food safe) is all that is needed.




A trivit. Just a simple frame with some zebrawood inlay banding, and a bunch of wine corks. The inside dimensions of the frame are 7" X 7" which is the perfect size for 32 corks.




A celleret. This is an ambitious project for an advanced woodworker. Done in the Federal Style, there is a lot of detail and a lot of inlays. I do not work from plans, but if you want more detailed pictures, and detailed dimensions, I can provide them - just send me an eMail, or call me.






A walnut and cherry box by Barry Hudgins, out of Danville, VA. Check out the attention to detail, including the corner matching of the inlay banding.




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